Sun, 05 Feb 2023


A new study published in the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres shows that European summers are warming much faster than the global average.


Summer temperatures in Europe have soared in recent years, with temperatures rising by more than 2 degrees Celsius in most regions. (Photo via Unsplash.com)

London, UK (Merxwire) - The global warming effect is profound and has even caused a counterattack. The World Meteorological Organization report shows that in the past 30 years, Europe has experienced the highest degree of global warming. The report pointed out that from 1991 to 2021, Europe will increase by an average of 0.5 degrees every ten years, while the worldwide average will only increase by 0.2 degrees. The extremely high temperature also made the summer in Europe uneasy. Not only did the highest temperature in the UK exceed 40 degrees for the first time, but heat waves, fires, forest fires, etc., caught people off guard.

According to the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), land areas are warming significantly faster than oceans, averaging 1.6 degrees Celsius versus 0.9 degrees Celsius respectively. This means the global budget for greenhouse gas emissions to limit land warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius has been exhausted. Summertime warming has exceeded 2 degrees Celsius across much of Europe over the past four decades, according to a new study by researchers at Stockholm University.

The greenhouse effect caused the climate counterattack in southern Europe. Dry air results in low soil moisture and reduced evaporation. In addition, due to less cloud cover in most parts of Europe, there is less water vapor in the air. Coupled with the impact of global warming, the soil is drier than before, and the arid areas have become more dehydrated. There is a heat wave or a fire crisis.

According to the report "Spread Like Wildfire: The Threat of Abnormal Landscape Fires is Rising," jointly released by UNEP and GRID-Arendal, extreme climate and land changes around the world are exacerbating wildfires. Destructive to organisms and entire ecosystems.

The report also examines the contribution of aerosols to the assessment of warming. The researchers linked extreme temperature rises in Central and Eastern Europe to a recent reduction in aerosol emissions in the region. Aerosols are suspended particles that, unlike greenhouse gases, affect solar radiation by scattering some of the sunlight back into space, producing a cooling effect.

Extreme climate and land changes will significantly impact humans, organisms, and even the entire ecosystem. (Photo via Pexels.com)

In the past, coal-fired power plants in Central and Eastern Europe emitted many aerosols, which had a cooling effect on the greenhouse effect. However, since 1980, coal-fired power plants are no longer the leading source of power generation. As the aerosols in the air began to decrease, the temperature in Europe That is, it rises rapidly. The combined effect produces an extreme increase in temperature of more than two degrees. The researchers speculate that this effect portends future warming in regions with high aerosol emissions, such as India and China.

Carbon dioxide emitted by humans is the biggest threat to the global warming effect. COP27 (the 27th United Nations Climate Change Conference) was officially concluded in Egypt last month. Nearly 200 leaders worldwide were assembled to face the issue of climate change seriously. The formulation of carbon emissions is more rigorous. To implement the policy, enterprises and even the public in all regions should understand and support the country's commitment to reduce emissions and make life changes to fight climate change by saving energy and reducing carbon emissions.

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